Georgiana Goleanu's blog

Superstitions: Do's & Don'ts in Romania

Even Bram Stoker, who dazed and confused a lot of people and continues to do so, makes a note in his famous novel ‘Dracula’ regarding the superstitious people inhabiting Transylvania. So clearly, we have a pattern here! We’d therefore like to give you a heads up on the matter, as you might come across some of these do's and don’ts.

1859, January 24: A Fine Day in Romanian History

153 years ago , the two principalities of Moldova and Wallachia had a moment of brilliance- the type that makes history: both of them elected general Alexandru Ioan Cuza as prince or 'domnitor' therefore becoming The United Principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia.

The act from 24th January 1859  determined  a contradictory reaction: it was accepted by France, Russia, Sardinia and Prussia, it was received with prudent reserve by the English government, however Turkey and Austria were reluctant to it.

Traditional Romanian Food 101-What to Eat When Visiting Dracula's Country

Dear Readers,

We strongly believe that when visiting a foreign country, tasting the local cuisine is a must. Romania is no exception! It would be a shame to come here and eat pizza, Mc Donald's or Chinese food, just because you don't know what to expect! Plus, dining in a restaurant will only add value to your experience, for a very reasonable price. 

Cultural Treasures: The Fortified Churches in Transylvania

The fortified churches in Transylvania were the trademark of the Saxon population brought here by King Geza II of Hungary, in the 12th century. The church has always played an important role in the community’s life, being an influential power and a ‘trend’ setter.

The frequent enemy invasions in Transylvania, starting with the Tartars in 1241, determined people to consider more efficient solutions to protect themselves, their families and most precious belongings.

Snagov Monastery, Romania - the Burial Place of Vlad the Impaler

Where Did the Romanian Prince Vlad the Impaler Find His End?

About 40 kilometers north of Bucharest, on an island in the middle of Snagov Lake, lays the monastery with the same name. Built around the time of Vlad the Impaler's grandfather, the monastery has become famous as the burial place of the infamous prince of Walachia who would become the inspiration for Bram Stoker's Dracula.